World, As Seen from the most beautiful islands: Ireland and Cyprus

Alexandre de Juniac cosiders French plan for aviation tax unserious

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The French plan to introduce new environmental taxes will not make the aviation sector emission-free. In addition, its introduction will result in the loss of another 150 000 jobs in a sector that is already under considerable pressure. That is what the International Aviation Organisation IATA says in a response.

The French environmental agency CCC, set up under President Emmanuel Macron, has put forward a series of proposals to reduce emissions from the aviation sector. One of the plans is an ecotax on air tickets issued in France, which should be worth EUR 4.2 billion annually. The IATA stresses that France already has some of the heaviest air taxes in Europe.

The IATA indicates an earlier estimate by the French Civil Aviation Authority (DGAC). It estimated the job losses of the CCC proposal at 150,000. The negative impact on the French economy would be between EUR 5 billion and EUR 6 billion. The measures would ultimately reduce emissions by 3.5 million tonnes per year. This represents 1% of France’s total emissions.

IATA boss Alexandre de Juniac says he can’t take the proposal seriously. Certainly not at the present time when the sector is already being hit hard by the crisis. The Juniac also points to the 160,000 jobs that the government is trying to create with a budget of EUR 100 billion.

“In this time of crisis, we need a coherent policy that will save jobs, not a policy that will destroy jobs”, he said.

It also stresses that the aviation industry has worldwide obligations to make it more sustainable. As of next year, the sector is aiming for an emission-neutral growth. In addition, companies want to halve their emissions by 2050 compared to 2005 levels. The IATA leader also points out that airlines are subject to the European Emissions Trading Scheme for activities within Europe.

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World, As Seen from the most beautiful islands: Ireland and Cyprus

From Trinity st. to Limassol, Cyprus

Ireland and Cyprus have one thing in common. The most beautiful islands are divided. Even proportions are strikingly similar. Both nations strive for unity and a good glass of the news.

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